Original Articles

FAQs: How to Remove a PM – by Bahadar Ali Khan

FAQ: How to remove the democratically elected Prime Ministers of Pakistan?

ANS: If 58-2(b) exists and president is co-operative then dissolve the entire parliament which naturally will get rid of PM as well. Else get the justice done with PM by approaching courts of law who would initiate contempt of court and a soft revolution will follow that will wipe out PM

FAQ: You seem sarcastic, do you have any precedent to this effect?

ANS: Absolutely. 1990 Benazir’s first regime, 1993 Nawaz Sharif first regime, 1996 Benazir’s second tenure. Tool used was 58-2(b) and presidents were co-operative. Nawaz Sharif in his second tenure got rid of 58-2(b), courts summoned him for contempt proceedings. He was lucky to have some faithful followers who gate crashed the chambers of my lord justices of Supreme Court and ‘azad media’ was absent too thus NS couldn’t be washed away. Now Yusuf Gilani, tried to run a West Minister type democracy in Pakistan which doesn’t suit our temperament thus he should go, rather should be made a horrible example, as how dared he tried to complete his term.

FAQ: Wow that is seditious, if all of these techniques fail what will you do then.

ANS: LOL:) Easy just move 111 brigade and they will occupy the PTV and PM house. PM will be tried for some ‘grave’ crime and at the end either he would be hanged like Bhutto or be exiled to Saudi Arabian Saroor palace like NS.

PS. Make sure to obtain clemency like that of NS, you have to be a non-PPP PM otherwise …. well read the history.

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SK

3 Comments

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  • Of cours, PM is innocent. If U want to punish President Asif Ali Zardari, impeachment is easy way. But U don’t want to follow Constitution.

    follow me on twitter: @liberalonline

  • One More…
    Whcih country’s constitution have following clause?

    248. Protection to President, Governor, Minister, etc.
    (1) The President, a Governor, the Prime Minister, a Federal Minister, a Minister of State, the Chief Minister and a Provincial Minister shall not he answerable to any court for the exercise of powers and performance of functions of their respective offices or for any act done or purported to be done in the exercise of those powers and performance of those functions:
    Provided that nothing in this clause shall be construed as restricting the right of any person to bring appropriate proceedings against the Federation or a Province.

    (2) No criminal proceedings whatsoever shall be instituted or continued against the President or a Governor in any court during his term of office.

    (3) No process for the arrest or imprisonment of the President or a Governor shall issue from any court during his term of office.

    (4) No civil proceedings in which relief is claimed against the President or a Governor shall be instituted during his term of office in respect of anything done by or not done by him in his personal capacity whether before or after he enters upon his office unless, at least sixty days before the proceedings are instituted, notice in writing has been delivered to him, or sent to him in the manner prescribed by law, stating the nature of the proceedings, the cause of action, the name, description and place of residence of the party by whom the proceedings are to be instituted and the relief which the party claims.

    249. Legal proceedings.
    (1) Any legal proceedings which, but for the Constitution, could have been brought by or against the Federation in respect of a matter which, immediately before the commencing day, was the responsibility of the Federation and has, under the Constitution, become the responsibility of a Province, shall be brought by or against the Province concerned; and if any such legal proceedings were pending in any court immediately before the commencing day then, in those proceedings, for the Federation the Province concerned shall, as from that day, be deemed to have been substituted.

    (2) Any legal proceedings which, but for the Constitution, could have been brought by or against a Province in respect of a matter which, immediately before the commencing day, was the responsibility of the Province and has under the Constitution become the responsibility of the Federation, shall be brought by or against the Federation; and if any such legal proceedings were pending in any court immediately before the commencing day then, in those proceedings, for the Province the Federation shall, as from that day, be deemed to have been substituted.