Original Articles

Quetta: The dream city gone rogue – by Quetta Revolution

Quetta, which once used to be called a dream city now lies nothing more than a pile of rubble for crushed dreams and as a new name for the Sawat Valley. What once used to be called the “Little London” now lies under siege by banned militants, which the authorities after constant assurances weren’t able to handle and put down to Justice.

In 2013 Quetta became known to be the victim of the deadliest attacks of the country’s history, On January 10th dual bombs took down more than a 120 innocent civilians at Alamdar Road and more than 130 on the 16th of Feb, almost all of which were the Shia Hazaras and non-Hazara Shias, most of which were innocent women and children.

Pakistan finally started to know the pain, the Shias of Quetta had been feeling for more than a decade of constant negligence and inhuman violations of basic human rights. Rallies spread out in the country with more than 50 million Shias united as one for the rights of Shia’s of Quetta.

This was yet another chapter of the book that Quetta and It’s people made only in Twenty Thirteen.

The world witnessed rallies which had never been seen before, what Journalists described as the only movement in the history of Pakistan which made the authorities accept all the demands without even moving or throwing a stone (any violent acts).

The Devastations:

Hundreds of Families were affected in a span of three months from December to February, from pilgrims (Zaireen) on their way from Punjab to students with ages not more than two all became a victim of the devastations of the Land of Quetta.

It seemed the world ended for some, and was at an urge of ending for others, but something changed this time, something that shook the ground of human morals, Pakistan stood up, it stood up for its people, it stood up for it’s nation. A nation as one made amendments which turned down a corrupt government and the will of the people was established.

What we achieved was a now more prosperous Quetta, A Quetta going back to it’s foregrounds, where people now feel some sort of a back, protecting them and helping them stand up. I myself as a guy from Quetta feel proud to be a part of a community which was helped by not only the people from our own nation but from the world itself. I feel Quetta Going back to it’s tracks

Patriotism leaning Back:

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The sense of rejection now seems to be lifted, life finally turns back to it’s former self. People perceive Baluchistan to be an Anti Pakistan mental Zone, But only one side of the story comes by peoples eyes and ears. The Shia Hazaras of Quetta were always true to the Pakistani cause and the sense of negligence that they felt now really lifts back. “We Feel proud to be a nation. We Feel proud to be a Pakistani national.”, said a young boy Latif, at the 23rd March event.The Picture here describes a Story of a young girl in Quetta living in a small mudhouse at the very peak of Koh-e-Mardar (The Mariabad, Alamdar Road Mountain) with the Pakistani Flag still hanging at her home door.

Life Returning to Normal with full of spirits:

Children Playing Cricket in Quetta

It seems the Backbone reassembled itself and stood up, people are returning to their ordinary lives with more hopes and dreams then ever. The picture here describes the scene of the local Hangout place “The Dam” on the day of “Nauroz”, the first day in the Calendar to a Spring, “The new beginning” as meant in the Persian calendar. The sense of being cared and appreciated really made a hardline for the Shia Hazara People of Quetta, and now more than ever they’re devoted to make their lives as well as others a better slumber and a safe haven. The occasional insecurities still remains, but the Shia Muslims of Pakistan along side other humanitarians made it possible for them to live and try to let the ghosts of past be nothing but a bad memory with hopes and dreams to come.

Quetta rises from the ashes with hopes and dreams, thanks to the Pakistani nation.

About the author

Shahram Ali

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